NSAIDs

nsaids

Episode 208: PREMIUM – COPD, gout and NSAIDs oh my

In episode 208, James and Mike PREMIUM to the max with three interesting studies that could change your practice. We talk about duration of steroids for COPD exacerbations, when to start allopurinol after a gout attack and which NSAIDs are the safest from a cardiovascular perspective. You need to hear all about this!

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Episode 172: A sporting look at sports injuries and their treatments

In episode 172, Mike and James welcome Karim Khan a sports physician to the podcast, and a marathon discussion about a variety of sports injuries and treatments ensues. We sprint towards discussions of patellofemoral syndrome, ankle sprains, stretching, ice, and NSAIDs and collapse at the finish line 45 minutes later.

Show notes - to folllow

Episode 127: Questions from near and far and answers from way out - Part III

In episode 127, Mike and James attempt to answer questions about topical NSAIDs, bleeds on NSAIDs and SSRIs, Strep throat, statins in the UK, and NSAIDs and CVD risk. They smish and smash all the available data into partly coherent answers, yet give definitive and dogmatic answers with the conviction of a dog with a bone or a cardiologist with a statin. Read more »

Episode 115: PREMIUM - Honey, should you shoot the NSAIDs?

In episode 115, Mike and James, in yet another stellar PREMIUM performance, provide the listening audience with the definitive answer on the cardiovascular risks associated with the NSAIDs. They then bring in a guest (Winnie-the-Pooh) to discuss in a sweet fashion whether or not there are any benefits from using honey for cough in children. Read more »

Episode 96: Making the treatment of low back pain less of a pain in the derrière – part 2

In episode 96, Mike and James continue on with the discussion around evidence for low back pain treatment. They discuss things like traction, heat, exercise and bedrest and then finally get into drugs - not personally of course, at least not much, but into the discussion  of which ones work and by how much. Read more »

Episode 88: A hodgepodge from down under - smoking, ASA, antibiotics, NSAIDs, warfarin, spironolactone

In episode 88, James and Mike continue their conversation with Bruce Arroll from down under and cover a broad range of topics from smoking to antibiotics for acute bronchitis, warfarin, and spironolactone. At the end of the podcast Bruce and Mike decide that much of what James has to say is up and over the top.

Show notes

1) Stopping smoking benefit Read more »

Episode 75: Starting insulin and stopping pain or is it stopping insulin and starting pain?

In episode 75, Mike and James get together with Tina one more time to talk about two topics that have nothing to do with each other (starting insulin in type II diabetics and treating acute musculoskeletal pain in children). However, through the magic of podcasts we transition seamlessly from one topic to the other without any pain and without having to start insulin. Be amazed. Read more »

Episode 51: More useful clinical trials - with a gentler touch - Part II

In episode 51, we again bring in the charming Dr. Tina Korownyk to help us work through 4 more recent studies that hopefully will have relevance to your practice. Read more »

Episode 33: NSAIDS: Considering the Risks and Benefits

In our 33rd episode we follow-up our discussion of osteoarthritis by examining the risks and benefits of oral anti-inflammatories including Cox-2 inhibitors. We review the effects on pain relief and the theory of anti-inflammation. We discuss the possible gastrointestinal effects and possible approaches to reduce the risk. Read more »

Episode 32: Aches and Pains: An Overview of Osteoarthritis Treatment

In our 32nd episode we review the therapeutic options for the treatment of osteoarthritis. We first deal with lifestyle interventions for osteoarthritis. We consider the pain pharmaceuticals like acetaminophen, topical or oral NSAIDs, and opiates as well as some of the other osteoarthritis therapies such as glucosamine or steroid injections. Read more »

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