asa

asa

Episode 164: PREMIUM Stuff you really need to know about HDL, ASA and metformin

In episode 164, Mike and James finally get to another PREMIUM episode and boy is it ever premium. We discuss the latest HDL raising drugs, ASA after a DVT, and a new meta-analysis of metformin. With our usual skill, alacrity and boyish charm we give all our premium listeners their monies worth with practice changing evidence.

Show notes Read more »

Episode 118: The mind boggles and the heart goes all a flutter - Part 2

In episode 118, James and Mike continue their discussion of atrial fibrillation by going into details about the evidence for treating patients with atrial fibrillation and how to make decisions between ASA/warfarin/dabigatran and also what it means to be in or out of the INR therapeutic range. Read more »

Episode 117: The mind boggles and the heart goes all a flutter

In episode 117, Mike and James delve into the first of a few podcasts on options for atrial fibrillation. In this first podcast they look at ways to assess risks and talk at length about a web-based tool that makes the process as easy as possible. The process is so easy that the hearts of both Mike and James start to flutter yet only one of them decides to take warfarin. Read more »

Episode 93: Questions posed, answers (de)composed - N and V, statins, ASA and Alzheimer's

In episode 93, we once again get back to listener questions. We explore everything from haloperidol for nausea and vomiting, to statin dosing, ASA in diabetics, and finally Alzheimer's drugs. Towards the end, James and Mike realise that listener questions are too hard and they make up some easy ones of their own yet still struggle.

Show notes Read more »

Episode 80: Listener comments and questions with an attempt at answers - Part II

In episode 80, Mike and James continue getting back to listener questions. We discuss such topics as glucose monitoring, ezetimibe, niacin, nebulised salbutamol and niacin with uncanny intuitive insight coupled with a degree of emotional sensitivity rarely encountered in podcasts. We then wake up and get Peter Loewen to help answer a difficult question on oral anticoagulants. Read more »

Episode 68: The "heart of the matter" for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

In episode 68, we get to the “heart of the matter” of stroke prevention for atrial fibrillation. We find out from Peter Loewen, that it is all a numbers game, and he gives us the tools to deal with this issue. We talk about warfarin and ASA and clopidogrel with respect to their benefits and harms. Read more »

Episode 67: A clot, a clot, I want it not – secondary stroke prevention with antiplatelets

In episode 67, we address ischemic stroke of arterial origin and go over some core therapies (ASA, dipyridamole, clopidogrel and warfarin).  We also discuss complications of anti-thrombotics and the options for patients with a GI bleed on ASA.  Although Peter attempts to guide us through the maze of evidence, all three of us get lost and have trouble finding our way back. Read more »

Episode 66: A clot, a clot, I want it not – secondary prevention with antiplatelets

In episode 66, we embark on a journey of epic proportions; at least relative to our understanding.  With the help of Peter Loewen, we outline the anti-platelet options in secondary prevention of heart disease.  We discuss at length the use ASA and clopidogrel but also touch on additional agents like warfarin, dipyridamole and others.  Where the evidence is clear, we create opacit Read more »

Episode 65: A clot, a clot, I want it not - primary prevention with antiplatelets

In episode 65, we start back at it with a discussion of using antiplatelets to decrease the chance of MIs and strokes. Read more »

Episode 62: Type 2 Diabetes – how sweet it isn’t – THE END

In episode 62, the eighth and final podcast in our tome on the treatment of type-2 diabetes, we talk about cholesterol and ASA. Statins have evidence of benefit, around 3-4% absolute risk reductions over 5 years, other drugs for cholesterol have little if any evidence of benefit, and there is evidence of no benefit from taking ASA. Read more »

Syndicate content